We are the Liberal Blog From Hollywood
L.A.'s Premier Post Facility

L.A.'s Premier Post Facility

Photographer in L.A.

Hot Pics & Gossip.

Archive for December 4th, 2011

Late Late Night FDL: Peace On Earth

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on December 4th, 2011 5:44 am by HL

Late Late Night FDL: Peace On Earth
Peace on Earth. This Metro Goldwyn Meyer cartoon was released on December 9, 1939 and nominated for the 1940 Academy Award for Best Short Subject, Cartoons.

Peace on Earth.  This Metro Goldwyn Meyer cartoon was released on December 9, 1939 and nominated for the 1940 Academy Award for Best Short Subject, Cartoons.

Directed by Hugh Harman.  Produced by Hugh Harman and Fred Quimby.  Written by Jack Cosgriff, Charles McGirl, and Khat Harman.  Voices by Mel Blanc (Grandpa Squirrel) and others.  Original Music by Scott Bradley.  Charles Wesley, hymnist, Hark! The Herald Angels Sing (uncredited).

Grab your popcorn, put your feet up on the seatback in front of ya, and aim your spitballs at the ushers please.  This is Late Late Night FireDogLake, where off topic is the topic … so dive in.  What’s on your mind?

Sunday Talking Heads: December 4, 2011
As Peterr notes, “Someone at ABC has a sense of humor. Scheduling Barney Frank behind Rick Santorum is hilarious.” And lookee! a complete Chris Hayes lineup, may we be so lucky from now on. TBogg hosts James Wolcott for Book Salon, dday and Stuart Zechman Virtually Speak and the Monday Movie is Charles & Ray Eames: The Architect and the Painter.

Lucking Out: My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty in Seventies New York

As Peterr notes, “Someone at ABC has a sense of humor. Scheduling Barney Frank behind Rick Santorum is hilarious.”

And lookee! a complete Chris Hayes lineup, may we be so lucky from now on.

TBogg hosts James Wolcott for Book Salon, dday and Stuart Zechman Virtually Speak and the Monday Movie is Charles & Ray Eames: The Architect and the Painter.

Washington Journal.

ABC’s This Week: Rick Santorum.  Then, Rep. Barney Frank (D-MA)Roundtable: George Will, Donna Brazile, Arianna Huffington, Major Garrett. Finally, Angelina Jolie on her movie about Bosnia, “In the Land of Blood and Honey.”

CBS’ Face the Nation: Republican National Committee Chair Reince Priebus. Obama Campaign Advisor Robert Gibbs. Roundtable: Norah O’Donnell, John Dickerson, Nancy Cordes, Mike Allen.

CNN’s State of the Union: Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX). Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN). Sen. John McCain (R-AZ). Roundtable: Alice Rivlin, Douglas Holtz-Eakin, Ron Brownstein.

Chris Hayes: Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, President of The National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference.  Dr. Donald Berwick, Former Administrator for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under President Obama. Jared Bernstein, executive director of the White House Task Force on the Middle Class, and a member of President Obama’s economic team. Chrystia Freeland, editor of Thomson Reuters Digital. Mahlon Mitchell, President of the Professional Fire Fighters of Wisconsin and a possible candidate for Wisconsin governor, should Gov. Scott Walker be recalled. John McWhorter, Columbia University Professor of Linguistic and American Studies, and Contributing Editor at New Republic and TheRoot.com. Katrina Vanden Heuvel, editor & publisher at The Nation magazine.

Chris Matthews: Do Republicans Dislike Mitt Romney So Much That They Might Nominate Newt Gingrich? Is Iran The Biggest Threat Now, and Will It Be A Political Problem for President Obama?

Fareed Zakaria – GPS: Former Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou. Roundtable: Anne-Marie Slaughter, Ian Bremmer, Gideon Rose, Nile Gardiner. Then, the man behind Pakistan’s “memogate” scandal, Mansoor Ijaz.

Fox News Sunday: Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN). Sen. Kent Conrad (D-ND) Chair, Budget Committee and Sen. Tom Coburn (R-OK) Senate Finance Committee.  Roundtable: Byron York, Mara Liasson, Ed Gillespie, Kirsten Powers. Power Player of the Week: Kahil Byrd, CEO of Americans Elect.

NBC’s Meet the Press: David Axelrod. Republican National Committee Chair Reince Priebus. Roundtable: Publisher of the New Hampshire Union Leader Joe McQuaid, Katty Kay, Harold Ford, Jr., Mark Halperin.

Newsmakers: White House National Economic Council Director Gene Sperling discusses the latest jobs numbers and the economy. With the latestunemployment rate dropping to 8.6%, Sperling said “It’s not nearly good enough.” Sperling called on Congress to pass an extension and expansion of the payroll tax credit, a proposal the Senate failed to advance last week…

Q & A: Film producer Carl Colby discusses his latest documentary film about the life of his father, former CIA Director William Colby. Carl details the actual production of the film, and discusses the choice of his mother, Barbara Colby, as one of his primary interview sources…

Religion & Ethics.

60 Minutes: Prosecuting Wall Street – Two whistleblowers tell Steve Kroft that their warnings about fraudulent and substandard mortgages were ignored by their companies, offering a rare window into the root causes of the subprime mortgage meltdown still holding back the struggling U.S economy.  Michael Bublé – He fills concert halls and has sold 35 million albums by covering classic American songs made famous by crooners like Frank Sinatra and Tony Bennett. Lara Logan profiles this still-rising singer whose current album, “Christmas,” is number one.

To the Contrary: Topics: Obama to choose between Bishops and women’s groups on birth control. The Failure of abstinence only programs. Celebrity Advocacy—Actress Monique Coleman and Singer Natalie Imbruglia. Panelists: Global Summit of Women President Irene Natividad; Independent Women’s Forum’s Executive Director Nicole Kurokawa Neily; CNN Political Analyst Leslie Sanchez; and Former Bush White House Aide Mercedes Viana Schlapp.

Univision’s Al Punto: Dan Restrepo, Special Assistant to the President and Director for Western Hemisphere Affairs at the National Security Council; Netzai Sandoval, Human Rights Lawyer; Meron Reuben, Fifteenth Ambassador of Israel to the United Nations; Esai Morales, Actor and Activist.

Virtually Speaking: David Dayen and Stuart Zechman discuss developments of the week, highlighting issues neglected or misrepresented on the Sunday morning broadcasts, drawing from their work of the prior week and the wickedly funny Bobblespeak Translations on the Most Outrageous Moment from the Sunday morning talk shows.

C-SPAN’s Book TV.

FDL’s Book Salon: My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty in Seventies New York. “A beguiling mixture of Kafka Was the Rage and Please Kill Me, this memoir is a sharp-eyed rendering, at once intimate and shrewdly distanced, of a fabled milieu captured just before it slips into myth.” Chat with author James Wolcott and host TBogg. 5pm ET.

FDL’s Movie Night Monday: Charles & Ray Eames: The Architect and the Painter. “Jason Cohn and Bill Jersey’s definitive documentary delves into the private world the Eameses created in their Renaissance-style, Venice Beach, California studio, where design history was born.” Join filmmaker Jason Cohn and host Lisa Derrick, 8pm ET.


Disabled Euro

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on December 4th, 2011 5:43 am by HL

Disabled Euro

By Deng Coy Miel, Cagle Cartoons, Singapore

Mr. Fish's Cartoon

Related Entries


The Cain Train Sputters and Stops
To audible sighs of collective grief and dismay, Herman Cain announced the suspension of his presidential campaign Saturday, assuring supporters and everyone else that he is a “fighter” who “would not go away.” A suspension, as opposed to a formal closure, allows Cain to continue collecting money. Cain made comments that seemed to point to multiplying allegations of sexual harassment as the reason he quit the campaign. He is expected to endorse a candidate soon. —ARK The New York Times: “As of today, with a lot of prayer and soul searching, I am suspending my presidential campaign,” Mr. Cain said at a rally here, surrounded by supporters chanting his name. “Because of the continued distractions, the continued hurt caused on me and my family, not because we are not fighters. Not because I’m not a fighter.” In suspending his candidacy, as opposed to saying that he was quitting the race or ending his bid, Mr. Cain maintained his ability to accept money to pay for his campaign so far and to finance the new venture that he called his Plan B: to travel the country promoting his tax and foreign policy plans. If Mr. Cain had decided to formally close his campaign organization, he would not be able to use donations that may come in. Read more

To audible sighs of collective grief and dismay, Herman Cain announced the suspension of his presidential campaign Saturday, assuring supporters and everyone else that he is a “fighter” who “would not go away.” A suspension, as opposed to a formal closure, allows Cain to continue collecting money.

Cain made comments that seemed to point to multiplying allegations of sexual harassment as the reason he quit the campaign. He is expected to endorse a candidate soon. —ARK

The New York Times:

“As of today, with a lot of prayer and soul searching, I am suspending my presidential campaign,” Mr. Cain said at a rally here, surrounded by supporters chanting his name. “Because of the continued distractions, the continued hurt caused on me and my family, not because we are not fighters. Not because I’m not a fighter.”

In suspending his candidacy, as opposed to saying that he was quitting the race or ending his bid, Mr. Cain maintained his ability to accept money to pay for his campaign so far and to finance the new venture that he called his Plan B: to travel the country promoting his tax and foreign policy plans. If Mr. Cain had decided to formally close his campaign organization, he would not be able to use donations that may come in.

Read more

Related Entries



Arianna Huffington: Sunday Roundup

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on December 4th, 2011 5:42 am by HL

Arianna Huffington: Sunday Roundup
This week, as police shut down the Occupy encampment in Los Angeles, a trio of stories fortified the movement’s fundamental argument about the two-tiered nature of our democracy. First up was a report on how, in July 2008, then-Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson gave a group of Wall Street cronies inside information on the rescue of Fannie and Freddie. Then came word that, in the midst of the financial meltdown, the Fed had secretly loaned banks $7.7 trillion with absolutely no strings attached — loans the banks used to turn a $13 billion profit (while foreclosures escalated and small businesses struggled to get loans). Finally, heroic Judge Jed Rakoff’s rejection of a sweetheart fraud settlement the SEC had gift-wrapped for Citigroup turned a spotlight on how the public interest is routinely sacrificed on the altar of expediency, and how the lack of accountability makes it much more likely that the wrongdoers will do wrong again and again without paying a real price.

Officers Fired For Airing Opinions On Drug Laws
PHOENIX â?? Border Patrol agents pursue smugglers one moment and sit around in boredom the next. It was during one of the lulls that Bryan…

Romney Snags Iowa Endorsement
Iowa’s Sioux City Journal has endorsed Mitt Romney for president. The endorsement touts Romney’s strength on financial issues, claiming that he would be the best…

Biden, Turkish Host Trade Boasts
Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. came to this ancient city that spans Europe and Asia to talk about building bridges between the United…

Delia Lloyd: 5 Political Novels Worth Reading
I’m not sure I see that there’s necessarily a trade-off between fiction and non-fiction. More to the point, however, I completely reject that premise that fiction is so obviously apolitical.


Presented By:

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on December 4th, 2011 5:41 am by HL

Presented By:

NLRB Advances Union Rule Despite GOP Board Member’s Threat To Quit
Despite threats from the sole Republican member of the National Labor Relations Board that he’d quit over a controversial union elections law, the board voted two-to-one on Wednesday to advance part of a rule that union leaders said would decrease delays in the elections process.

Right-Wing Freak-Out: Children’s Movies Pushing Liberal Agenda
On its surface, Happy Feet Two is a cutesy sequel about a young penguin who is reluctant to dance. But could there be a radical left-wing agenda lurking below the arctic ice? Some conservatives think so, The Hollywood Reporter reports,…



Madam Jane predicts: American wars will cause deadly climate change

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on December 4th, 2011 5:38 am by HL

Madam Jane predicts: American wars will cause deadly climate change
I just had a dream that it was the end of the world. So should I still go Christmas shopping or not? Why bother, I thought. But just to be on the safe side, I also asked the mysterious psychic Madam Jane for some input. “Are my dreams and the Mayan calendars and all those […]


Mitt’s Mythical Math on Health Care and Defense

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on December 4th, 2011 5:37 am by HL

Mitt’s Mythical Math on Health Care and Defense
All right — I wasn’t going to blog on the Wednesday afternoon before Thanksgiving until someone tweeted me Igor Volsky’s great piece at Think Progress eviscerating Mitt Romney’s assertion that he would save money by cancelling the Obama health plan…

UNESCO: Boycott For Boycott?
The admission of the Palestinian Authority into UNESCO has occasioned a fuss about the American response, the automatic cutting of $70 million in funding to the organization, triggered by existing, AIPAC-inspired Congressional legislation. (M.J. Rosenberg’s good column on the subject…



Washington Post Edits Out Climate Change from Its Sea-Level Rise Story

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on December 4th, 2011 5:36 am by HL

Washington Post Edits Out Climate Change from Its Sea-Level Rise Story
Projected sea level rise IF we don’t get off our current emissions path (which is between A2 and A1FI).  The WashPost omitted any mention of climate change in its sea level rise story, even though a key source talked about it with the reporter. by Elliott Negin, Union of Concerned Scientists, in a HuffPost repost. […]

http://thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/SLR-PNAS-pic.gif

Projected sea level rise IF we don’t get off our current emissions path (which is between A2 and A1FI).  The WashPost omitted any mention of climate change in its sea level rise story, even though a key source talked about it with the reporter.

by Elliott Negin, Union of Concerned Scientists, in a HuffPost repost. [I add some comments of my own at the end — JR.]

The Washington Post flunked Climate Science Reporting 101 this week, fumbling an opportunity to remind its readers about the threat global warming poses right here, right now.

On Monday, the day the latest round of annual U.N. climate negotiations opened in Durban, South Africa, the paper ran a scene-setter in its front section headlined “Global pact gives way to local action.” It pointed out that countries, states, provinces and municipalities are initiating their own policies to cut carbon emissions in the absence of a universal binding agreement. That story was not the problem.

The second story, which was plastered on the paper’s front page, is where the Post fell down on the job.

In Chincoteague, a stampede against beach changes” reported on a dispute between the federal government and town leaders in a small Virginia coastal resort town best known for its wild ponies. The town’s 4,300 year-round residents survive on tourism — some 14,000 vacationers visit daily every summer, according to the state transportation department. But its beach — a part of the Assateague Island National Seashore and the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge — is threatened by sea-level rise.

Without getting bogged down in the details, suffice it to say that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the federal agency that manages national refuges, recently proposed a new, 15-year plan to safeguard the more than 300 species of birds and other wildlife at Chincoteague. One of the options would move the public beach about a mile north where it would be less vulnerable to sea-level rise, build remote parking lots in a more stable area, and shuttle beachgoers in buses. The town mayor and many residents oppose the plan, fearing the proposed changes would turn off tourists.

The Post story included the what, who, where and how of basic journalism. What was missing was the why. Why is sea level rising and eroding the beach in Chincoteague?

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, over the last century, sea level rose 5 to 6 inches higher along the Mid-Atlantic than the global average because coastal land there is sinking. But there is another key factor: Global warming.

“Higher temperatures are expected to further raise sea level by expanding ocean water, melting mountain glaciers and small ice caps, and causing portions of Greenland and the Antarctic ice sheets to melt,” according to an EPA web feature “Coastal Zones and Sea Level Rise.” “The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that the global average sea level will rise between 0.6 and 2 feet (0.18 to 0.59 meters) in the next century.”

The story never mentioned the connection.

I called Louis Hinds, Fish and Wildlife’s Chincoteague refuge manager, who was quoted in the piece. “I talked about climate change in my interview with the Post,” he said. “I use ‘climate change’ and ‘sea-level rise’ interchangeably.” Hinds also was quick to point out that the climate issues that plague Chincoteague aren’t unique. His agency has compiled examples from all 50 states of how global warming is imperiling wildlife.

Why is it such a big deal that the Post story failed to mention climate change?

Because public officials in Chincoteague and Richmond continue to deny it is happening — and aren’t doing anything about it.

Hinds has to deal with that fact in his job. “I’ve been the refuge manager here for four years, and when I got here, no one was discussing the climate change problem,” he said. “Some members of the community do not accept the reality of climate change, but they face its consequences every day.”

Meanwhile, the McDonnell administration’s attitude has ranged from skepticism to outright hostility.

Gov. Bob McDonnell’s bad cop is Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, who for the last year and a half has been harassing former University of Virginia climate scientist Michael Mann, accusing him of fraud. My group, the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), organized a letter signed by 800 Virginia scientists and academic leaders condemning Cuccinelli’s baseless investigation and filed amicus briefs supporting UVA. (See UCS’s June briefing paper, “Science Under Attack.”) Cuccinelli yesterday confirmed that he will run for governor in 2013.

McDonnell’s slightly nicer cop is Virginia Secretary of Natural Resources Doug Domenech, who encapsulated the administration’s position at a June 28 press briefing. That’s when he announced that the governor had declined to revive a climate-change commission convened by his predecessor, Gov. Tim Kaine, which had recommended dozens of ways the commonwealth could cut carbon emissions and adapt to changes that already are occurring, such as rising sea levels. The McDonnell administration has not acted on any of those recommendations, and Domenech, who worked under President George W. Bush’s notoriously anti-environmental Interior Secretary Gale Norton, joked that he couldn’t remember if he even saw the commission’s final report. “I’m sure there’s a copy around here somewhere,” he said.

Why the indifference? “The climate is changing, no doubt,” Domenech said, “but it’s always changing… Humans might be part of the cause, but too often in the debate it’s missed that the Earth has been warmer in the past and it has been a lot cooler in the past… So I would say the science is mixed on a lot of those things.”

Finally, Domenech told reporters “It’s a global issue, and it’s hard to say what changes we could make that would make that much of a difference.”

In fact, there a number of things Virginia could do to make a difference, just like the cities, states and countries mentioned in the story the Post ran last Monday on the U.N. climate talks in Durban. For one, its legislature could establish a renewable electricity standard similar to what 29 states and the District of Columbia now have in place. Those standards require local utilities to generate from 10 percent to 33 percent of their electricity from renewable sources such as wind and solar by a specific year. Virginia currently has an unenforced voluntary standard of 15 percent. Virginia also could initiate aggressive efficiency programs that would cut residential and industrial energy use, as well as preparedness programs, such as coastline management plans, to help communities adapt to climate change.

That brings us back to the Post’s Chincoteague story and its glaring omission. To be fair, the paper ran a story in June about sea-level rise at Virginia Beach that stated in the second paragraph that the culprits are climate change and the fact that the area is sinking. So it’s not as if the Post doesn’t get it. But given the cavalier attitude the McDonnell administration has about this critical issue, it is incumbent upon the news media to continually remind Richmond that climate change is a serious threat and that it has a responsibility to address it.

As Louis Hinds, the Chincoteague refuge manager, said to me the other day, “The fact that some members of the community do not believe that sea-level rise or climate change are happening doesn’t mean that I can choose to ignore the science.” That goes for the news media, too.

– Elliott Negin is the director of news and commentary at the Union of Concerned Scientists in Washington, D.C.

JR:  One wonders what the residents would think if someone actually told them what the latest science said.  The original article notes:

More than 100 yards of shoreline has been lost to the Atlantic Ocean since the mid-1960s, said Louis Hinds, the refuge manager. A federal visitors center has been moved twice from rising waters. And if cars didn’t occupy the 8.5-acre parking lot, piping plovers, an endangered shorebird the refuge protects, would nest there.

The changes facing Chincoteague are coming to coastal communities across the nation. In Hampton Roads, planning commissions are preparing for the day, 30 to 50 years from now, when sea-level rise reshapes the coast, and a few landowners are resisting.

At the core of the debate in Chincoteague are questions of fairness.

Should the federal government close a beach it established and helped popularize? Over a half-
century, it shored up Chinco­teague’s way of life, spawning dozens of hotels and hundreds of rental houses, restaurants and shops.

If I’d known this was a possibility .?.?. we wouldn’t have quit our jobs and opened a store,” said Jonathan Richstein, who bought Sundial Books on Main Street in 2007 with his wife, Jane.

Even back in 2007, it was clear that Chincoteague was unlikely to survive the inevitable triage that is coming from our refusal to take any serious action on greenhouse gas emissions.  I’ve visited Chincoteague many times, particularly for the oysters.  It is very flat.  Here is “Debris on Beach Road at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia after Hurricane Irene.”

Debris on beach road at Chincoteague NWR

Now it seems increasingly likely to be unsavable by mid-century (see “JPL bombshell: Polar ice sheet mass loss is speeding up, on pace for 1 foot sea level rise by 2050“), particularly  if it were to be hit by a major hurricane in, say, a couple of decades.

Proposed plans for the future of Chincoteague’s beach.

Scott Walker?s New Policy May Result In Protesters Being Charged For The Pepper Spray Used Against Them
Under a new policy unveiled late this week by the Walker administration, protesters who apply for permits to protest outside government buildings in Wisconsin may be charged for clean-up costs and the presence of police officers. “Gov. Scott Walker now wants to charge protesters for the time that the police that will monitor them and […]

Under a new policy unveiled late this week by the Walker administration, protesters who apply for permits to protest outside government buildings in Wisconsin may be charged for clean-up costs and the presence of police officers. “Gov. Scott Walker now wants to charge protesters for the time that the police that will monitor them and presumably pepper spray them,” Current TV’s Keith Olbermann observed last night. Watch it:

Marquette University Law School prof. Edward Fallone told the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel that he’s “skeptical about charging people to express their First Amendment opinion. … You can’t really put a price tag on the First Amendment.”

Recently, the city of Nashville billed Occupy Nashville $1,045 for security the day before it decided to evict the entire encampment. The Republican governor of that state, Bill Haslam, is also in the process of formulating a new policy to restrict the ability of protesters to occupy state grounds.


Republican hopefuls make pitch at Huckabee forum

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on December 4th, 2011 5:35 am by HL

Republican hopefuls make pitch at Huckabee forum

Former House speaker Newt Gingrich, facing increased scrutiny as he solidifies his standing atop the Republican presidential field, sought to convince conservatives in a forum Saturday night that he would not stray from a limited-government philosophy.

Asked why conservatives should trust that he won’t advance “big government approaches,” given his history of supporting an individual health-care mandate, climate change policies and a larger federal role in education policy, Gingrich said it was his years in Washington that made him best-suited to transform government.

Read full article >>

Ex-presidential candidate George McGovern ‘resting comfortably’ in SD hospital after fall

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — Former Democratic presidential candidate George McGovern was alert, comfortable and in stable condition at a South Dakota hospital Saturday after hitting his head during a fall, hospital officials said.

The 89-year-old former U.S. senator was taken by helicopter to a Sioux Falls hospital late Friday after falling outside Dakota Wesleyan University’s McGovern Library in Mitchell. A school official said McGovern hit his head on the pavement about two hours before he was scheduled to appear on a live C-SPAN interview at the library.

Read full article >>

Herman Cain suspends his campaign for 2012 GOP presidential nomination

ATLANTA — The brief but dramatic campaign of Herman Cain ended on Saturday, when the little-known businessman who captivated the Republican race said the relentless attention on accusations of his sexual misconduct had become too much to bear.

Both defiant and passionate, Cain again denied allegations of sexual harassment and an extramarital affair, while declaring, “I’m not going away.”

Read full article >>

For Romney, a day of door knocking in N.H.

MANCHESTER. N.H. — As former House speaker Newt Gingrich surges in the Republican presidential primary polls, longtime New Hampshire favorite Mitt Romney returned to the state Saturday to try to convince residents that he is not taking their votes for granted.

In a stark contrast to Gingrich, who confidently predicted in an ABC News interview Thursday that he would be the party’s nominee, Romney’s team handed out buttons that read “earn it” at an early morning rally in the parking lot of a Manchester pizza parlor as supporters readied for a day of door knocking.

Read full article >>

ProPublica review of pardons in past decade shows process heavily favored whites

White criminals seeking presidential pardons over the past decade have been nearly four times as likely to succeed as minorities, a ProPublica examination has found.

Blacks have had the poorest chance of receiving the president’s ultimate act of mercy, according to an analysis of previously unreleased records and related data.

Read full article >>


Rick Perry’s War on Women

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on December 4th, 2011 5:31 am by HL

Rick Perry’s War on Women
Jordan Smith, The Nation
Governor Rick Perry took the lectern at the annual “Life & Liberty” fundraiser for the Texas Alliance for Life with a smile on his face. It was 2010 and he was in the thick of a re-election campaign, but this was not a crowd he needed to woo. “I kind of feel like I’m at a family reunion,” he told the audience.Reflecting on his years of collaboration with the group, Perry said, “We have promoted in this state a culture of life. We have strengthened families. We have protected our children’s future.” And, he…

Obama Has Lost a Faithful U.S. Ally in Egypt
Keith Koffler, WH Dossier
Obama’s Egypt failure is becoming all the more plain, and the cultural and political Islamization of our most important Arab ally may well become a campaign issue before longThe New York Times today reports that not only are Islamists ascendant in Egypt, but their most radical fringe is faring much better in the ongoing elections than expected.

China Heading for a Hard Landing

Job Creation Remains Weak in November
Jeff Cox, CNBC
Job creation remained weak in the U.S. during November, with just 120,000 new positions created, though the unemployment rate slid to 8.6 percent, a government report showed Friday.The rate fell from the previous month's 9.0 percent, a move which in part reflected a drop in those looking for jobs. The participation rate dropped to 64 percent, from 64.2 percent in October, representing 315,000 fewer job-seekers.