We are the Liberal Blog From Hollywood
L.A.'s Premier Post Facility

L.A.'s Premier Post Facility

Photographer in L.A.

Hot Pics & Gossip.

Archive for October 27th, 2014

Illegal Petes Restaurant Asked to Change Name

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 27th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Illegal Petes Restaurant Asked to Change Name
Three weeks shy of opening his newest Illegal Pete’s in Old Town Fort Collins, Colorado, restaurant owner Pete Turner came to town Wednesday to listen to a crowd of offended residents who asked that he change his business’ name. The Boulder-based restaurant with six locations in Boulder and Denver is modeled after Mexican food from San Francisco’s Mission District, specifically over-sized burritos. The name Illegal Pete’s, Turner claimed, is a literary reference to a bar in a novel he read as an English major in Boulder.

Compound in Cocoa May Reverse Memory Loss
A new study suggests that a natural compound found in cocoa can reverse age-related memory loss. Unfortunately this compound is often removed during the processing of cocoa that is used in chocolate consumed by individuals as desserts. The compound was also found to be present in some teas and vegetables. The exact amount of compound necessary to have an effect is not known at this time. The study used an amount range of 10 mg to 900 mg a day. The study was done with a specially made cocoa flavanol drink developed by Mars who also subsidized the study.


Former Judges Seek to Stop Upcoming Missouri Execution

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 27th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Former Judges Seek to Stop Upcoming Missouri Execution
Along with his current lawyers, judges express concern regarding previous representation. 

3Q user growth hits Twitter stock after-hours
NEW YORK (AP) — Twitter’s third-quarter revenue outpaced expectations, but investors concerned about user growth and holiday-quarter sales clipped the company’s stock price late Monday.

New Afghan president to head to China
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The new Afghan president travels to China this week, signaling the pivotal role he hopes Beijing will play in Afghanistan’s future, not only in the economic reconstruction of the war-ravaged country after U.S. and allied combat troops leave by the end of the year but also in a strategic foreign policy aimed at building peace across a region long riven by mistrust and violence.


Bush clan mostly on board with a Jeb presidential bid

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 27th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Bush clan mostly on board with a Jeb presidential bid
Which Bush is the holdout on Jeb Bush’s possible presidential aspirations?

Joe Manchin: Endangered Democratic colleagues are key moderates
The West Virginia senator said the Senate needs people who reach across the aisle


Not Just “Ordinary Street Thugs”: Limbaugh Accuses Clinton And Warren Of Forming “Marauding Bands” To Attack Business

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 27th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Not Just “Ordinary Street Thugs”: Limbaugh Accuses Clinton And Warren Of Forming “Marauding Bands” To Attack Business

From the October 27 edition of Premiere Radio Networks’ The Rush Limbaugh Show:

Previously:  

Media Forget Context In Effort To Scandalize Hillary Clinton’s Assessment Of Trickle-Down Economics

Limbaugh: Obama To “Whine And Moan” About Inequality In Order “To Stigmatize The Rich”

Contrary To Right-Wing Media Claims, Middle Class Is Key To Economic Growth


Reagan’s Campaign Speech Continues to Reverberate 50 Years Later

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 27th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Reagan’s Campaign Speech Continues to Reverberate 50 Years Later
Michael Barone, RealClearPolitics
On Oct. 27, 1964, 50 years ago Monday, a movie actor and television host delivered a 30-minute speech on primetime national television in support of the presidential candidacy of Barry Goldwater. There were no visual diversions, and the production values by today’s standards were primitive. Few if any viewers realized it, but they were watching a future president of the United States. But perhaps Ronald Reagan, the man on screen, had an inkling. Higher-ups in the Goldwater campaign didn’t want him on the air, for fear he would distract attention from the current candidate. But Reagan, using…

No Labels Backs Gardner Ground Effort in Colorado
Adam O’Neal, RealClearPolitics
No Labels, the nonpartisan political group aimed at ending gridlock in Washington, will actively support Rep. Cory Gardner in the final days of his challenge against Colorado Sen. Mark Udall. According to an email obtained by RealClearPolitics, No Labels “will be staging independent Get Out The Vote efforts to support our Problem Solver members” between Oct. 31 and Election Day. Gardner is one of those members and is specifically mentioned in the email. Sent late last week, the email asks former interns if they are “willing to travel to either Sacramento, California or…

The Secrets Behind 2014
E.J. Dionne, RealClearPolitics
WASHINGTON — There’s a hidden history to the nasty midterm election campaign that will, mercifully, end on Nov. 4. What’s not being widely talked about is as important as what’s in the news. Underappreciated fact No. 1: The number of Democratic seats that are not in play this year. In planning its effort to take control of the Senate, Republicans shrewdly launched challenges to Democrats in states that would not automatically be on a GOP target list. “Broadening the map” is wise when you’re in a strong position. Two of the states on that extended list, Colorado and Iowa, have paid off for…

Capito Win Could Cap GOP Transformation of W.Va.
Sean Trende, RealClearPolitics
Almost every political observer agrees that Rep. Shelley Moore Capito will be Sen. Shelley Moore Capito when the next Congress convenes. Almost every political observer also agrees that it won’t even be close; Capito leads her opponent, Secretary of State Natalie Tennant, by 17 points in the RealClearPolitics average. There is also a reasonable chance that West Virginia will have an all-Republican House delegation. What I think gets lost in the commentary is how amazing this is. If Nick Rahall loses, and Republicans retain the open 2nd Congressional District, it will be the first…


Ministers lose judicial review votes

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 27th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Ministers lose judicial review votes
Ministers are defeated three times in the Lords over plans to limit the scope for judicial reviews of public decisions.

AUDIO: Fallon ‘misspoke’ on immigration
Defence secretary Michael Fallon says he “misspoke” when warning some areas of the UK could be “swamped” by immigrants.

VIDEO: What odds on Brand for London mayor?
Russell Brand is linked to a campaign to run as London mayor in 2016, but the bookies are not taking him seriously.


Napolitano wants more immigration action

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 27th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Napolitano wants more immigration action
President’s deferred action program is “a good petri dish” for more steps, she says.


Chris Christie Says He Didn’t Reverse Himself On Ebola Quarantine After Releasing Nurse Kaci Hickox

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 27th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Chris Christie Says He Didn’t Reverse Himself On Ebola Quarantine After Releasing Nurse Kaci Hickox
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) is insisting that his state’s tough new Ebola rules haven’t changed despite the release of a nurse from quarantine on Monday.

“I didn’t reverse my decision,” Christie said in Florida, where he is campaigning on behalf of Gov. Rick Scott (R). “She hadn’t had any symptoms for 24 hours. And she tested negative for Ebola. So there was no reason to keep her.”

Kaci Hickox, 33, was quarantined on Friday after traveling to New Jersey from Sierra Leone, where she was treating Ebola patients with Doctors Without Borders. Although she tested negative for the disease, Hickox was placed into isolation, leading to widespread criticism and the threat of a lawsuit.

But Christie said on Monday that Hickox had a fever, was symptomatic after her arrival and needed to be quarantined as a result.

She was obviously ill enough that the CDC and medical officials hospitalized her and gave her an Ebola test,” Christie said in remarks transcribed by The New York Times. “They don’t that just for fun. That’s a very specific, difficult, expensive test to do.”

Over the weekend, Hickox said she never had any symptoms.

I heard from my mother last night who called me concerned and said, Gov. Christie just said in an interview that you were quote-unquote ‘obviously ill.’ And this is so frustrating to me,” Hickox said on Sunday. “First of all, I don’t think he’s a doctor. And secondly, he’s never laid eyes on me. And thirdly, I have been asymptomatic since I’ve been here.”

On Friday, Christie and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced that all travelers who had direct contact with Ebola patients would be subject to a mandatory 21-day quarantine. The location of the quarantine was not specified.

Hickox was the first person quarantined under the new rules, and because she lives in Maine, she was placed in an isolation tent with no shower and a portable toilet at University Hospital in Newark.

Christie said on Monday that if Hickox had been a New Jersey resident, she would still be required to complete a 21-day quarantine at home since she worked with Ebola patients. But because she is symptom-free, she is being allowed to return to her home in Maine.

The new rules were put in place after Dr. Craig Spencer, who worked with Ebola patients in Africa, was diagnosed with the disease the day after he had been traveling around the city by subway.

Critics say such mandatory quarantines could potentially discourage healthcare workers from traveling to Africa to help end the crisis.

On Sunday, Cuomo clarified that residents without symptoms can complete the quarantine at home.


Islamist Party in Tunisia Concedes to Secularists

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 27th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Islamist Party in Tunisia Concedes to Secularists
Nidaa Tounes has won the largest number of seats in the election, defeating its main rival, the Islamist party Ennahda, according to two analyses of results.



Brazil Vote Highlights a Rift Linked to Economics
President Dilma Rousseff, who was re-elected on Sunday, has signaled changes that could bring a shift away from policies that have created anger in Brazil’s business establishment.



Q. and A.: Investigating Abandoned Chemical Weapons in Iraq
C.J. Chivers, a New York Times reporter, and John Ismay, a contributor, respond to readers’ questions about aging chemical munitions found in Iraq.

World Briefing: Iraq: Suicide Bomb Kills Scores in a Town Seized From ISIS
A suicide bomber driving a Humvee packed with explosives drove into a security checkpoint for Iraqi troops and Shiite militiamen south of Baghdad on Monday, killing at least 38, officials said.




Without More International Aid, We Won’t Be Able To Stop Ebola

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 27th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Without More International Aid, We Won’t Be Able To Stop Ebola

Individual contributions to combat Ebola have lagged behind natural disaster relief efforts in years past.

The post Without More International Aid, We Won’t Be Able To Stop Ebola appeared first on ThinkProgress.

President Barack Obama speaks to the media about the government?s Ebola response, in the Oval Office of the White House.

President Barack Obama speaks to the media about the government?s Ebola response, in the Oval Office of the White House.

CREDIT: AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Ebola cases could reach more than 170,000 by mid-December if developed nations don’t provide more international aid, a team of Yale researchers recently predicted.

Researchers reached that ominous conclusion after tracking the spread of the virus in Montserrado County — a highly populous region of Liberia that includes Monrovia, its capital city — and using a special mathematical equation to measure its future impact.

Experts say that financial assistance could increase the supply of Ebola treatment center beds and tools that aid in the rapid identification of new cases and bring forth the wider distribution of protective kits to households of those infected by the virus.

These findings, published in a recent issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases, could galvanize efforts by world leaders and global health organizations to bridge a medical personnel and supply gap in West Africa that has thwarted efforts to stunt Ebola.

“Our predictions highlight the rapidly closing window of opportunity for controlling the outbreak and averting a catastrophic toll of new Ebola cases and deaths in the coming months,” study senior author Alison Galvani, professor of epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health, said in a university news release.

Galvani added: “Although we might still be within the midst of what will ultimately be viewed as the early phase of the current outbreak, the possibility of averting calamitous repercussions from an initially delayed and insufficient response is quickly eroding.”

In September, World Health Organization (WHO) Assistant Director General Bruce Aylward announced that battling the Ebola epidemic would cost $1 billion for the construction of treatment centers, strengthening of laboratory testing, tracing the spread of the virus, safe burials, and monitoring for reports of suspected cases around the world.

Raising those funds, however, has proven to be a huge undertaking. Individual contributions to combat Ebola have lagged behind natural disaster relief efforts in years past; so far, four major U.S. aid organizations have raised $19.5 million, a far cry from the $1.3 billion they raised in the months after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Since the beginning of the outbreak, Doctors Without Borders has only received more than $31 million in private donations, more than $7 million of which came from the United States.

Some experts say that’s because the impact of an “invisible” disease has been hard to convey to the public. But others blame the WHO and other global health groups for failing to make an appeal to the world in a manner they think would have solicited more donations. This week, a Doctors Without Borders representative suggested that fundraising didn’t increase until September, when the United States experienced its first domestic infection.

Subsequent cases — the most recent of which involved a doctor in New York who recently traveled to West Africa — have led to lots of policies intended to to keep Americans safe, including the establishment of 21-day quarantine stations in New York and New Jersey, which are points of entry for foreign travelers. But a host medical professionals, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, say that fighting Ebola at the epicenter in West Africa would actually be the best way to contain the outbreak.

In August, the White House pledged 17 new treatment centers with 1700 beds and 3,000 military personnel, efforts that will cost up toward $750 million in the next six months. Experts said that may not suffice, especially since Liberia still has less than a quarter of the nearly 3,000 beds needed, but administration officials thought that the U.S.’ actions would compel other foreign governments to act.

More than a month later, however, many countries have been slow to answer the call to action. In August, increasing health risks compelled officials in the Philippines to pull nearly 3,500 health workers out of West Africa. China, which hopes to expand its influence in Africa, has also fell short on its $34 million pledge, contributing $8 million thus far.

The European nations haven’t done much better. While the United Kingdom pledged more than $190 million to support Sierra Leone’s efforts to combat Ebola, it has doled out nearly one-tenth of that amount so far. France has contributed no more than $7.4 million to the main U.N. fund. Italy has only followed through on a quarter of its $2 million pledge. Spain has also contributed less than $600,000 thus far.

In recent weeks, President Obama has reached out to world leaders, telling them that their contributions would best help stop the spread of the disease at its source. He also sent U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power to Guinea to analyze the situation on the ground and assess what additional supplies are needed.

“There are a number of countries that have capacity that have not yet stepped up,” Obama recently told the Associated Press. “Those that have stepped up, all of us are going to have to do more, because unless we contain this at the source, this is going to continue to pose a threat to individual countries at a time when there’s no place that’s more than a couple of air flights away. And the transmission of this disease obviously directly threats all our populations.”

There’s still a glimmer of hope. Members of the European Union have followed Obama’s lead, increasing efforts to raise more than $1 billion last week. Cuba has followed through on a pledge to train and send doctors, nurses, and disease specialists to infected areas in West Africa. The Japanese government also announced that it would provide access to an anti-influenza drug currently under development. Canada has also pledged more than $58 million, shipped an experimental Ebola vaccine to WHO’s headquarters in Geneva, and deployed two diagnostic laboratories in Sierra Leone.

The post Without More International Aid, We Won’t Be Able To Stop Ebola appeared first on ThinkProgress.