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Archive for October 20th, 2014

Congress Candidate Calls Gay Couples ‘Gremlins’

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 20th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Congress Candidate Calls Gay Couples ‘Gremlins’
Rep. James Clyburn’s (D-S.C.) Republican challenger referred to same-sex couples as “gremlins” and “bullies” in a Facebook post urging supporters to oppose gay marriage at the polls this fall. Anthony Culler, the GOP nominee for Clyburn’s seat, wrote a Facebook post on Oct. 14 decrying same-sex marriage as “a pestilence that has descended on our society, against our will, by those in the courts and government that do not value the traditional family.”


Does Nina Pham’s Dog Have Ebola? Answer Expected Soon

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 20th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Does Nina Pham’s Dog Have Ebola? Answer Expected Soon

The nurse’s purse-sized pooch is currently in quarantine.

Celeb birthdays for the week of Oct. 26-Nov. 1
Oct. 26: Actress Jaclyn Smith (“Charlie’s Angels”) is 69. “Wheel of Fortune” host Pat Sajak is 68. Musician Bootsy Collins is 63. Singer Maggie Roche of The Roches is 63. Actor James Pickens Jr. (“Grey’s Anatomy”) is 62. Guitarist Keith Strickland of The B-52’s is 61. Actress Rita Wilson is 58. Actor Dylan McDermott is 53. Actor Cary Elwes is 52. Singer Natalie Merchant is 51. Country singer Keith Urban is 47. Actor Tom Cavanagh (“Ed”) is 46. Actress Rosemarie DeWitt (“The United States of Tara”) is 43. Writer-actor Seth McFarlane is 41. Actor Jon Heder is 37. Singer Mark Barry of BBMak is 36.

Ross, Hutchinson get final digs in on tax cuts
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Republican Asa Hutchinson and Democratic Mike Ross are dueling over their competing tax cut plans and over who has the best record of working with both parties in their final televised debate in the Arkansas governor’s race.


Kansas: The rise of the smash and grab election

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 20th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Kansas: The rise of the smash and grab election
John Dickerson: Will competitive Senate contests in Kansas and South Dakota lead to more late-breaking races in future elections?

The uphill battle for Obama’s new “Ebola czar”
Ron Klain faces a mountain of criticism from Republicans about his new job

Polling places continue to open for early voting across the country
Six states and Washington, D.C. open the doors to voters on Monday


Limbaugh: Democrats’ “All Out Assault” On Marriage, Religion, Science, And Education The Cause Of “National Angst”

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 20th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Limbaugh: Democrats’ “All Out Assault” On Marriage, Religion, Science, And Education The Cause Of “National Angst”

From the October 20 edition of Premiere Radio Networks’ The Rush Limbaugh Show:

Previously:

Rush Limbaugh Laments That Businesses “Must Service Anybody Who Walks In The Door”

“All-Out Jihad” On The Culture: Limbaugh Reacts To Lesbian Girl Scout Hire

Rush: In Vetoing AZ Anti-Gay Bill, Gov. Brewer “Vetoed Religious Freedom”


Ebola, Ideology and Common Sense

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 20th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Ebola, Ideology and Common Sense
Pat Buchanan, RealClearPolitics
Growing up in Washington in the 1930s and ’40s, our home was, several times, put under quarantine. A poster would be tacked on the door indicating the presence within of a contagious disease — measles, mumps, chicken pox, scarlet fever. None of us believed we were victims of some sort of invidious discrimination against large Catholic families. It was a given that public health authorities were trying to contain the spread of a disease threatening the health of children. Out came the Monopoly board. Polio, or infantile paralysis, was the most fearsome of those diseases. The first two…


VIDEO: Barroso dismisses ‘bureaucrat’ jibe

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 20th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

VIDEO: Barroso dismisses ‘bureaucrat’ jibe
Outgoing European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso dismisses Grant Shapps “bureaucrat” jibe.

VIDEO: UKIP spokesman defends UKIP Calypso
UKIP Commonwealth spokesman Winston McKenzie has said the song UKIP Calypso, which is performed with a mock Caribbean accent by DJ Mike Read, is “fantastic”.

Peers back revenge porn ‘offence’
The House of Lords agrees unanimously to make “revenge porn” a criminal offence in England and Wales.


Even Beloved Figure Is Prey to Robbers in Pakistani City

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 20th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Even Beloved Figure Is Prey to Robbers in Pakistani City
Robbers targeted the home and headquarters of Abdul Sattar Edhi, taking more than $1 million and gold jewelry that had been donated to his foundation.



Board Says Saudi Detainee Should Be Repatriated
Officials determined that it was no longer necessary to imprison Muhammed Murdi Issa al Zahrani at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, where he has been held for more than 12 years.

North Korea Challenges U.N. Report on Violations
A veteran diplomat denied North Korea had prison camps and warned against any effort to charge the country’s leader, Kim Jong-un, with crimes against humanity.



Shipwreck Was Simple Murder, Migrants Recall
Four days had passed since their overcrowded migrant boat had capsized in the Mediterranean, after being rammed in an apparent quarrel between smugglers. The Palestinians were now weak and hallucinating.



U.S. Denial of Visas for 6 in Hungary Strains Ties
The diplomatic incident involving the unnamed public officials has transfixed Hungarian political circles and provided fresh evidence of growing tension between the two nations.




First Draft: Obama Votes Early

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 20th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

First Draft: Obama Votes Early
President Obama cast his ballot in the midterm elections as early voting started in his hometown, Chicago, hoping to send a message to the Democratic faithful about the importance of turning out to vote.




Liberia’s ‘Brain Drain’ Is Thwarting Its Efforts To Stop Ebola

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 20th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

Liberia’s ‘Brain Drain’ Is Thwarting Its Efforts To Stop Ebola

The most qualified Liberians are reluctant to live and work in their country of birth.

The post Liberia’s ‘Brain Drain’ Is Thwarting Its Efforts To Stop Ebola appeared first on ThinkProgress.

Health workers carry the body of a woman that they suspect died from the Ebola virus, as children, right rear, watch in a area known as Clara Town in Monrovia, Liberia, Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014.

Health workers carry the body of a woman that they suspect died from the Ebola virus, as children, right rear, watch in a area known as Clara Town in Monrovia, Liberia, Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014.

CREDIT: AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh

The Ebola outbreak has shed light on a dearth of medical professionals in West Africa, especially in Liberia, a nation still reeling from a 14-year civil war. Fewer than 170 qualified doctors live there and qualified Liberian doctors and nurses around the world aren’t eager to return to their home country right now.

Since Liberian health officials reported the first case of Ebola in March, nearly 100 doctors have succumbed to the disease, scaring many of those on the front lines. In recent weeks, reports have surfaced of medical personnel deserting the Ebola-stricken at treatment units in Liberia.

Last week, doctors and nurses went on strike in demand of an adequate wage and a “risk bonus” for caring for patients. Reports stated that although government and global health organization officials promised up toward $750 in monthly wages for medical personnel, many said they received less than a third of that amount. That conflict shows promise of coming to an end; the chairman of Liberia’s national health workers’ union has expressed a willingness to negotiate with President Sirleaf.

But it will take more than a few dozen medical personnel to tackle a disease that has ravaged much of the region. Earlier this week, Sirleaf called for all hands on deck in an “open letter to the world” that BBC producers read on air. She said the current outbreak “requires a commitment from every nation that has the capacity to help — whether that is with emergency funds, medical supplies or clinical expertise.”

While the United States, some European countries, Cuba, and some global health organizations have sent help to the region, many Liberian doctors living around the world — including Dr. James Adama Sirleaf, the president’s son, who lives in Georgia — remain wary to return to their native land.

This reluctance among the most qualified Liberians to live and work in their country of birth, however, goes beyond the Ebola outbreak, or even West Africa for that matter. A 2013 report by the United Nations’ Department of Economic and Social Affairs showed that one out of nine Africans with a university degree migrate to one of 34 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development member states — including the United States, Britain, France, Australia, Russia, and Spain.

The trend has created what some experts call a “brain drain,” defined as a gap in expertise caused by the emigration of talented, educated Africans to more developed nations. The brain drain has played a role in the devastation of health care infrastructures around the continent. According to data from online health workplace policy journal Human Resources for Health, one out of five African-born physicians and one-tenth of African-born nurses work overseas. Their reasons for relocating include better pay and the desire to raise families in more stable environments.

While African doctors make advancements in medical research elsewhere, their countries’ health care systems suffer. Liberia is no exception. Before the Ebola outbreak, there was just one doctor for nearly 90,000 people in the country. Many of those doctors take assignments in Monrovia, Liberia’s capital city, ultimately leaving the rural areas uncovered. The medical personnel shortage has forced senior government officials — including former Health Minister Dr. Peter Coleman and current Health Minister Walter Gwenigale — to moonlight as medical personnel.

Before the Ebola outbreak, experts said that post-war Liberia needed to increase its number of qualified medical personnel tenfold to provide adequate health care services to people living in the country. Gwenigale also suggested that doctors be paid $1,000, five times the average salary. That’s very unlikely, however, due to a host of factors including inadequate educational facilities that fail to attract the top professionals.

While Liberia has provided medical education in the post-civil war era, it hasn’t proven sufficient in convincing recent medical school graduates to pursue a career in the West African country. A 2011 survey of medical students and a physicians found that barriers to medical training included a “lack of clinical and basic science faculty.” Students at A.M. Deligotti College of Medicine, the country’s only medical school, recounted studying by candlelight in dormitories with no running water or electricity.

Those negative experiences most likely have taken a toll on many who graduate from that institution. Nearly all of the fewer than a dozen people who complete their studies at the medical school annually take their talents elsewhere.

“Most of Liberia’s best minds are in the Diaspora,” Edmund Zar-Zar Bargblor, the vice president of the Liberian Community Association of Rhode Island, argued in a piece on TLC Africa.com. “Present conditions in Liberia demand that Liberians with the requisite skills and talents need to be identified and encouraged to return home, to help with the economic recovery process.”

Bargblor’s words haven’t fallen on deaf ears. Liberian officials too have long recognized the brain drain as a problem that could threaten its future development. Shortly after she entered office, Sirleaf promised that the government would assist Deligotti in improving its facilities. In recent years, some people have also petitioned Liberian officials to follow the lead of other nations in awarding dual citizenship to the best and brightest Liberians who decide to travel while maintaining ties to their home country.

The post Liberia’s ‘Brain Drain’ Is Thwarting Its Efforts To Stop Ebola appeared first on ThinkProgress.


What Are ‘Nation’ Interns Reading the Week of 10/16/14?

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on October 20th, 2014 11:08 pm by HL

What Are ‘Nation’ Interns Reading the Week of 10/16/14?
From: StudentNation

What are interns reading for the week of 10/16/14?

Venezuela at the UN, Washington At Bay
From: Greg Grandin

The US tried to block Venezuela from the United Nations Security Council, and failed. 

The Supreme Court Eviscerates the Voting Rights Act in a Texas Voter-ID Decision
From: Ari Berman

In three of four major voting rights cases in the past month, the Supreme Court has ruled to restrict voting rights. 

Just for Gaffes: Why the Political Press’s Obsession With Minutiae Is No Joke
From: Eric Alterman

Eric on this week’s concerts and releases and Reed on how the gaffe-obsessed political press is doing a disservice to democracy.

Stop Surgical Violence Against Women Athletes—and Let Dutee Run!
From: Dave Zirin

A world-class athlete is standing up to the barbaric surgical practices women are subjected to in international sports. She deserves our support.