We are the Liberal Blog From Hollywood
L.A.'s Premier Post Facility

L.A.'s Premier Post Facility

Photographer in L.A.

Hot Pics & Gossip.

Archive for August 21st, 2011

Study: Species Flee Global Warming

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on August 21st, 2011 4:44 am by HL

Study: Species Flee Global Warming
Animals and insects across the world are fleeing global warming by heading north much faster than they were less than a decade ago, a new study says. “The speed is an important issue,” said study author Chris Thomas of the University of York. “It is faster than we thought.”



Sunday Talking Heads: August 21, 2011

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on August 21st, 2011 4:43 am by HL

Sunday Talking Heads: August 21, 2011
Mostly horse racing again today but that will include some coverage of Obama and his beloved base. Peterr speaks: Given that Scarecrow will be hosting his own DC-based Sunday morning event at the DC jail, it seems someone else will have to give his usual “WTF were the bookers thinking?” comments. I’ll start the ball […]

Lt. Dan Choi at the Tar Sands Sit-In, that's Jane filming him. photo by Josh Lopez

Mostly horse racing again today but that will include some coverage of Obama and his beloved base.

Peterr speaks:

Given that Scarecrow will be hosting his own DC-based Sunday morning event at the DC jail, it seems someone else will have to give his usual “WTF were the bookers thinking?” comments. I’ll start the ball rolling . . .

  • Mark Zandi will be rather lonely, as the only panelist on CBS who inhabits the real world.
  • NBC stands out as particularly uninspiring this Sunday. EJ Dionne may want to scratch his eyes out.
  • Note that the 60 Minutes interview with Timothy Dolan is a re-run, and predates the mess in Ireland, the Philadelphia grand jury indictments of RC bishops’ staffers, and the NY marriage equality vote in Albany. IOW, why bother?
  • With the change of two words, Q&A might be a powerful piece: “Pamela Constable, author of a new narrative detailing the political, cultural, and religious complexities existing in modern day Pakistan  America. She portrays a country riddled with corruption, devastated by floods, and terrorized by Islamic Christian extremists…” Maybe Pamela will write a sequel.
  • What’s missing? Let’s see . . . the financial sector led the decline in the stock market this past week, so it might have been nice to have a banking expert in there somewhere. And no, Maria “Money Honey” Bartiromo doesn’t count. Bombs in Afghanistan seem to be off the Sunday Morning radar as well.

Now that I think about it, Scarecrow may be rather relieved to be away from this kind of nonsense for a Sunday.

Peterr

Washington Journal.

ABC’s This Week: Jake Tapper host. Republican presidential candidate Jon Huntsman. Obama campaign adviser David Axelrod. Roundtable: George Will, Donna Brazile, Jeff Zeleny of the New York Times, Frank Luntz, and Liz Claman of FOX Business Network. “And as the president begins his vacation, he might not be resting so easy as he gets flack from an unlikely place: his own base.”

CBS’ Face the Nation: Norah O’Donnell hosts. Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), Economist Mark Zandi. Former party chairs, Ed Gillespie and Terry McAuliffe.

CNN State of the Union: Obama campaign adviser David AxelrodGov. Bob McDonnell (R-VA) and Gov. Martin O’Malley (D-MD). Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) of the Congressional Black Caucus.  The economy – U.S. economic editor of The Economist Greg Ip and Editor of Thomson Reuters Digital Chrystia Freeland.

Chris Matthews: Is Perry Like Reagan, The Westerner Who Can Defeat The Establishment Romney? In Bad Economic Times, Would Perry’s Far Right Rhetoric Get Overlooked?

Fareed Zakaria – GPS: John Miller on al Qaeda.  And more.

Fox News Sunday: Horse race and the economy.  Roundtable: Bill Kristol, A.B. Stoddard, Steve Hayes,  Evan Bayh.

NBC’s Meet the Press: Horse race. Obama for America Campaign adviser, Robert Gibbs. Then, Gov. Mitch Daniels (R-IN). Roundtable: Harold Ford, Jr., Peggy Noonan, E.J. Dionne, Maria Bartiromo.

Newsmakers: On Newsmakers, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said he will release a proposal to update the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law next month. He said it is “punitive” in its current state and that schools need more “flexibility” and “autonomy” on how to educate children…

Q & A: Pamela Constable, author of a new narrative detailing the political, cultural, and religious complexities existing in modern day Pakistan. She portrays a country riddled with corruption, devastated by floods, and terrorized by Islamic extremists…

Religion & Ethics.

60 Minutes: U.S. vs. Drake – Tom Drake, a former National Security Agency senior executive, was indicted last year for espionage after leaking allegations to the media that the nation’s largest intelligence organization had committed fraud, waste and abuse. The 33 – Three months after 33 Chilean miners were rescued from a half-mile underground – where they lived in daily fear of death for 69 days – psychologists say more than 20 of them are experiencing serious mental stress. The Archbishop – In a wide-ranging interview with Morley Safer, New York’s Archbishop Timothy M. Dolan discusses the sex abuse crisis in the Catholic Church, his current mission and the state of the church in America.

To the Contrary: Topics: New research that finds women value higher education more than their male counterparts; the importance of a new memorial honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on the National Mall; and ways women can become more financially independent. Panelists: Rep. Donna Edwards (D-MD); The Heritage Foundation’s Genevieve Wood; The Progressive Magazine’s Ruth Conniff; and Conservative Commentator Tara Setmayer. Guest host: Donna Brazile.

Univision’s Al Punto: Cecilia Muñoz, White House Director of Intergovernmental Affairs; Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-IL); Clarissa Martinez, Director of Immigration and National Campaigns, NCLR; Israel Ortega, Editor, Heritage Libertad; Arnoldo Torres, Expert on Hispanic Issues; Ezequiel Hernandez, Immigration Lawyer; Felipe Matos, Student and Community Organizer, “Presente.Org.”

Virtually Speaking: Bobblespeak’s Culture of Truth and our David Dayen.

C-SPAN’s Book TV.

FDL Book Salon: Kill the Messenger: The Media’s Role in the Fate of the World. “What role do the media have in creating the conditions for atrocities such as occurred in Rwanda? Conversely, can the media be used to preserve democracy and safeguard the human rights of all citizens in a diverse society? How will the media, now global in scope, affect the fate of the planet itself.” Chat with author Maria Armoudian, hosted by our friend Spocko.  5pm ET.

FDL Movie Night Monday: Electric Daisy Carnival Experience. “The film itself is a rapturous, delirious, swirling ride through rave culture.” Come meet-up with director Kevin Kerslake and host Lisa Derrick, 8pm ET.

Late Late Night FDL: People Are Bunny
Bugs Bunny and Daffy DuckPeople Are Bunny. This Warner Bros Merrie Melodies cartoon was released on December 19, 1959.

Bugs Bunny and Daffy DuckPeople Are Bunny.  This Warner Bros Merrie Melodies cartoon was released on December 19, 1959.

Directed by Robert McKimson.  Story by Tedd Pierce.  Animation by Warren Batchelder, Ted Bonnicksen, George Grandpré, and Tom Ray.  Layouts by Robert Gribbroek.  Backgrounds by William Butler.  Film Editing by Treg Brown.  Voices by (in alphabetical order) Mel Blanc (Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Host) and Daws Butler (Art Lamplighter  – uncredited).  Original Music by Milt Franklyn.

Grab your popcorn, put your feet up on the seatback in front of ya, and aim your spitballs at the ushers please. This is Late Late Night FireDogLake, where off topic is the topic … so dive in. What’s on your mind?


Cancer Meds in U.S. Are in Short Supply

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on August 21st, 2011 4:42 am by HL

Cancer Meds in U.S. Are in Short Supply
A record 180 medicines used to treat cancers and a number of other diseases and infections are in short supply in the U.S. this year, and as a result prices for some have skyrocketed to as much as 20 times the original cost. Some clinical trials for new drugs have been delayed because researchers must also offer the older, short-supply medicines for comparison’s sake. Lawmakers and health care officials are working to find solutions to the supply problem, including possibly stockpiling cancer medications the way the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention already does with antibiotics in case of terrorist attacks or natural disasters. In the article below, The New York Times looks at the forces causing the problem. —BF The New York Times: A crucial problem is disconnection between the free market and required government regulation. Prices for many older medicines are low until the drugs are in short supply; then prices soar. But these higher prices do little to encourage more supply, because it can be difficult and expensive to overcome the technical and regulatory hurdles. And if supplies return to normal, prices plunge. Executives at Premier, a hospital buying cooperative, said that in April and May its members received hundreds of offers from obscure drug wholesalers to sell drugs in short supply at vastly inflated prices. Of the 636 offers that included a price, 45 percent were at least 10 times the normal rate and 27 percent were at least 20 times normal. Such sales offers are legal as long as suppliers prove that they bought the drugs appropriately. Read more

A record 180 medicines used to treat cancers and a number of other diseases and infections are in short supply in the U.S. this year, and as a result prices for some have skyrocketed to as much as 20 times the original cost.

Some clinical trials for new drugs have been delayed because researchers must also offer the older, short-supply medicines for comparison’s sake.

Lawmakers and health care officials are working to find solutions to the supply problem, including possibly stockpiling cancer medications the way the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention already does with antibiotics in case of terrorist attacks or natural disasters.

In the article below, The New York Times looks at the forces causing the problem. —BF

The New York Times:

A crucial problem is disconnection between the free market and required government regulation. Prices for many older medicines are low until the drugs are in short supply; then prices soar. But these higher prices do little to encourage more supply, because it can be difficult and expensive to overcome the technical and regulatory hurdles. And if supplies return to normal, prices plunge.

Executives at Premier, a hospital buying cooperative, said that in April and May its members received hundreds of offers from obscure drug wholesalers to sell drugs in short supply at vastly inflated prices. Of the 636 offers that included a price, 45 percent were at least 10 times the normal rate and 27 percent were at least 20 times normal.

Such sales offers are legal as long as suppliers prove that they bought the drugs appropriately.

Read more

Related Entries


U.K. Rioters: Young, Poor, Male and Unemployed
The Guardian put together a database of court cases of those detained during and after the unrest that swept London in early August after Metropolitan Police shot 29-year-old Mark Duggan in the city’s Tottenham neighborhood. British Prime Minister David Cameron said the riots “were not about poverty,” but analysis showed that 41 percent of rioting suspects within the judicial system live in areas that rank in the top 10 percent of the most economically dispossessed places in the country, with 66 percent of the neighborhoods in which the accused live having become poorer between 2007 and 2010. Heavy youth unemployment, child poverty and lack of educational opportunity were found in almost all of the areas where rioting was the worst. More then 90 percent of the accused are male. Review the list of cases and convictions so far here. —ARK The Guardian: Based on unprecedented access to information from magistrates courts across England, the Guardian’s data project gives a new insight into the riots, shedding light on those accused of involvement, from their age and gender to the length of sentences being handed down. … He [Liverpool University urban planning lecturer Alex Singleton] found that the majority of people who have appeared in court live in poor neighbourhoods, with 41% of suspects living in one of the top 10% of most deprived places in the country. The data also shows that 66% of neighbourhoods where the accused live got poorer between 2007 and 2010. … The Guardian database adds further detail to these statistics and appears to confirm that the accused are overwhelmingly young, male and often unemployed. Read more

The Guardian put together a database of court cases of those detained during and after the unrest that swept London in early August after Metropolitan Police shot 29-year-old Mark Duggan in the city’s Tottenham neighborhood.

British Prime Minister David Cameron said the riots “were not about poverty,” but analysis showed that 41 percent of rioting suspects within the judicial system live in areas that rank in the top 10 percent of the most economically dispossessed places in the country, with 66 percent of the neighborhoods in which the accused live having become poorer between 2007 and 2010. Heavy youth unemployment, child poverty and lack of educational opportunity were found in almost all of the areas where rioting was the worst. More then 90 percent of the accused are male.

Review the list of cases and convictions so far here. —ARK

The Guardian:

Based on unprecedented access to information from magistrates courts across England, the Guardian’s data project gives a new insight into the riots, shedding light on those accused of involvement, from their age and gender to the length of sentences being handed down.

… He [Liverpool University urban planning lecturer Alex Singleton] found that the majority of people who have appeared in court live in poor neighbourhoods, with 41% of suspects living in one of the top 10% of most deprived places in the country. The data also shows that 66% of neighbourhoods where the accused live got poorer between 2007 and 2010.

… The Guardian database adds further detail to these statistics and appears to confirm that the accused are overwhelmingly young, male and often unemployed.

Read more

Related Entries



Bruce Reyes-Chow: Jesus Christ, Michelle Bachmann And Other Lunatics

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on August 21st, 2011 4:41 am by HL

Bruce Reyes-Chow: Jesus Christ, Michelle Bachmann And Other Lunatics
One’s faith tradition must not in itself be used to wholly define or dismiss a person, especially a person who is passionate about his/her faith.

Ron Paul Wins New Hampshire Straw Poll
Ron Paul got a great birthday present Saturday, as the 76-year-old defeated 11 other Republicans in Saturday’s New Hampshire Young Republicans Straw Poll….

Michele Bachmann Seeks To Broaden Appeal
GREENVILLE, S.C. — Pigeonholed as a right-wing disciple, Michele Bachmann is offering herself as a presidential candidate who can unite the GOP’s disparate base and…


Low-Budget Anti-Abortion Doc Bloodmoney Explores Conspiracy To Get Girls Pregnant

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on August 21st, 2011 4:40 am by HL

Low-Budget Anti-Abortion Doc Bloodmoney Explores Conspiracy To Get Girls Pregnant
An anti-abortion documentary called Bloodmoney looks to expose “the multi-billion dollar industry that literally thrives on the destruction of unborn babies and the traumatizing of young pregnant women” — and how that industry conspires to use sex-ed to get young…

FBI: Father And Son Harassed Sarah Palin’s Attorney With Hundreds Of Calls, Vile Voicemails
A father and son arrested by FBI agents on Thursday for allegedly harassing Sarah Palin’s lawyer called his office hundreds of times earlier this month and left vile voicemail messages threatening the attorney, according to federal court documents unsealed Friday morning.



Rick Perry in Outer Space

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on August 21st, 2011 4:38 am by HL

Rick Perry in Outer Space


Why S&P Has No Business Downgrading the U.S.

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on August 21st, 2011 4:37 am by HL

Why S&P Has No Business Downgrading the U.S.
Standard & Poor’s downgrade of America’s debt couldn’t come at a worse time. The result is likely to be higher borrowing costs for the government at all levels, and higher interest on your variable-rate mortgage, your auto loan, your credit…


Bachmann & The Golden Bough
If there’s one book that’s familiar to every Liberal Arts major it’s probably James Frazer’s mighty tome on comparative religion, 1890’s “The Golden Bough.” For generations many undergraduates have probably used this classic work the way I did: as a…


Karl Rove Predicts Sarah Palin Will Run for President

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on August 21st, 2011 4:36 am by HL

Karl Rove Predicts Sarah Palin Will Run for President
Karl Rove aka Bush’s Brain predicted this morning on Fox News that Sarah Palin “gets in” to the presidential race next month (h/t TP): One can never really figure out Rove’s machinations since he helped ruin the country and his own party as President Bush’s consigliere. He and the Bush mob don’t like Rick “Four […]

Karl Rove aka Bush’s Brain predicted this morning on Fox News that Sarah Palin “gets in” to the presidential race next month (h/t TP):

One can never really figure out Rove’s machinations since he helped ruin the country and his own party as President Bush’s consigliere. He and the Bush mob don’t like Rick “Four Pinocchios” Perry — even though Rove  helped make Perry possible, as HuffPost has noted.

Certainly Obama looks beatable with his plummeting popularity and lame messaging, which is no doubt why Perry got it.  But if Palin were smart — yes, I know — why would she get in now, rather than a month ago, which might have forestalled Perry — or even earlier, to forestall  Michele Bachmann?  Her entry now means a three-way split for the tea party vote and would probably make Mitt Romney the happiest of all.

As for Palin herself, she makes Perry seem like Lincoln (see Palin blames ‘Gore-gate’ for “this snake oil science stuff”).  During the 2008 presidential campaign, the Washington Post itself gave her its highest (which is to say lowest) rating of “Four Pinocchios” for continuing to “to peddle bogus [energy] statistics three days after the original error was pointed out by independent fact-checkers.”

There aren’t enough Pinocchios in a children’s library for this crop of GOP presidential candidates.


Months after attack, Gabrielle Giffords now knows who died in shooting rampage

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on August 21st, 2011 4:35 am by HL

Months after attack, Gabrielle Giffords now knows who died in shooting rampage

PHOENIX — For months after the spasm of violence that shattered her world, Arizona congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was shielded from the wider scope of that January morning, when a gunman shot her in the head, badly wounding her and 12 others outside a Tucson political event.

Trying to protect her fragile state, staff and family members didn’t let her know that six had perished in the Jan. 8 attack, including one of her most trusted staff members and a federal judge who was a close friend.

Just weeks ago, Giffords found out the truth, delaying a grief process the rest of the country had gone through months before.

Read full article >>

Crimes against volunteers vex Peace Corps

A Peace Corps volunteer had been raped in Bolivia and wanted justice. Within hours, Julie De Mello was on an airplane from Washington to meet the victim.

De Mello, employed by the Peace Corps inspector general as a senior federal agent investigating crimes against volunteers, worked with the 23-year-old victim, Erin Bingham, to sketch the attacker. De Mello went with Bingham to a police lineup, hired a lawyer to represent her and worked with local police to track down witnesses.

De Mello believes her advocacy helped convict the rapist in 2008. He was sentenced to 10 years in prison.

Read full article >>

Huntsman gets more aggressive with opponents, Obama

Jon M. Huntsman Jr. is finally making good on his pledge to be more aggressive with his opponents, saying in a recent interview that he “wouldn’t necessarily trust” any of his opponents when it comes to the handling of the economy.

Huntsman, who sat down for his first Sunday show interview as a presidential candidate with ABC’s Jake Tapper, had harsh words for President Obama as well, saying that he lacked leadership and direction in the fight over the debt ceiling.

“I have to say that there was zero leadership on display in terms of my opponents .?.?. zero leadership on display in terms of the president, who should have used the bully pulpit well ahead of time. He should have walked away from the teleprompter. The people want you to speak from your heart and soul. Tell us where you want us to go. Tell us what you expect from Congress. Tell us what’s on your mind. That never happened,” he said in the interview, which airs on “This Week With Christiane Amanpour.” “And it waited until the eleventh hour and then we had some of my Republican opponents who basically, I think, recommended something that would have been catastrophic for this economy.”

Read full article >>

Perry criticizes government while Texas job growth benefits from it

LONGVIEW, Tex. — Texas Gov. Rick Perry has leapfrogged to the top tier of Republican presidential candidates largely on the strength of one compelling fact: During more than a decade as governor, his state created more than 1 million jobs, while the nation as a whole lost 1.4 million jobs.

Perry says the “Texas miracle” rests on conservative pillars that he would bring to the White House: minimal regulation and government, low taxes and a determination to limit the reach of Uncle Sam.

What he does not say is that much of that job growth has come because of government, not in spite of it.

Read full article >>

On the home front, reminders of the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq come in small doses

The wars came to the Nationals baseball game, as they always do, in the third inning.

The wounded troops from Walter Reed Army Medical Center had assembled in the stands behind home plate. Those in wheelchairs were in front. The ambulatory stood behind them. The Nationals pitcher threw a strike for the third out.

“Give a warm welcome to brave servicemen and women and their families joining us tonight,” the stadium announcer intoned. Now the troops were on the big screen in center field, and the modest Tuesday night crowd was standing, hooting and cheering.

Read full article >>


Obama’s Not Alone: Presidents End Up Unpopular

Posted in Main Blog (All Posts) on August 21st, 2011 4:31 am by HL

Obama’s Not Alone: Presidents End Up Unpopular
Michael Kazin, TNR
In Washington, on both left and right, a new piece of conventional wisdom is hardening into place: Barack Obama's presidency is slowly collapsing under the burdens of a bad economy, a rudderless foreign policy, and confusion about how the man who once twinkled with charisma wants to change the country. Even if the president manages to get re-elected, his chance to "win the future," pundits agree, is probably over. Such a descent is neither a remarkable nor an exceptional development in American politics, which might provide a bit of ironic comfort to Obama as he…

Buffett Wrong About Soaking Rich
Christopher Caldwell, Financial Times

The Reckoning Could Finally Be Upon Us

Rove Created Perry — Now Can He Stop Him?
Howard Fineman, Huff Post
WASHINGTON — Karl Rove won't say it aloud, but he is afraid of Rick Perry: afraid that the smack-talking Texas governor will wreck the GOP's chances of winning the White House and the Senate in 2012.The Perry-Rove story is shaping up as the ultimate tale of dangerously unintended consequences, with Rove in the role of Dr. Frankenstein and Perry as his living, rampaging political creation.Insiders know that Rove helped launch Perry's career by advising Perry's successful run for agriculture commissioner in 1990.But the larger, deeper point is that Rove designed and built…